Impetuous Peter! #11

Sunday, February 28, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

After wasting their time “fishing in the flesh” and catching nothing, the Apostles meet the resurrected Lord Jesus Christ. John chapter 21 informs us they do not recognize Him as He stands on the shore. However, once He directs them to throw their net on the right side, and they catch a multitude of fishes, they suddenly realize who He is! Dragging their heavy net to land, they meet and eat with Him.

“[14] This is now the third time that Jesus shewed himself to his disciples, after that he was risen from the dead. [15] So when they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my lambs. [16] He saith to him again the second time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my sheep. [17] He saith unto him the third time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? Peter was grieved because he said unto him the third time, Lovest thou me? And he said unto him, Lord, thou knowest all things; thou knowest that I love thee. Jesus saith unto him, Feed my sheep.”

The Lord asked Peter once (verse 15), “Lovest thou me more than these [fish]?” Peter replied in the affirmative; Jesus responded, “Feed my lambs.” Christ asked a second time (verse 16); Peter answered with a “yes.” Jesus again ordered Him, “Feed my sheep.” Christ questioned Peter a third time (verse 17), “Lovest thou me?” Peter—“grieved,” saddened or distressed—blurts out his tenth silly comment: “Lord, thou knowest all things; thou knowest that I love thee.” Instead of expressing annoyance, Peter should have shown gratitude for the Lord’s threefold questioning that nullified his thrice denial during His trial….

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Impetuous Peter! #10

Saturday, February 27, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

Christ Jesus has been crucified, killed, buried, and resurrected. In John chapter 20, Mary Magdalene and Apostles Peter and John discover His empty tomb (verses 1-10). Mary Magdalene sees Him first and even speaks to Him, ultimately reporting the news to the disciples (verses 11-18). That evening of Resurrection Sunday, He appears to all His disciples except “doubting Thomas” (verses 19-24). Eight days later, He revisits them—Thomas included (verses 25-29). Indeed, there is abundant proof Jesus is the Son of God, alive again (verses 30,31)!

Even after witnessing those spectacular sights, impetuous Peter produces yet another thoughtless pronouncement. John chapter 21: “[1] After these things Jesus shewed himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias; and on this wise shewed he himself. [2] There were together Simon Peter, and Thomas called Didymus, and Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, and the sons of Zebedee, and two other of his disciples. [3] Simon Peter saith unto them, I go a fishing. They say unto him, We also go with thee. They went forth, and entered into a ship immediately; and that night they caught nothing.”

Such is reminiscent of Luke 5:1-11, when Peter and his fishing partners James and John were on the Sea of Galilee and had futilely attempted to catch fish the previous night. Once Jesus gave the command, however, their nets were filled with fish! “…And Jesus said to Simon, Fear not; from henceforth thou shalt catch men. And when they had brought their ships to land, they forsook all, and followed him” (verses 10,11). Peter left his fishing business to serve Christ in ministry. Nevertheless, three years later, he denied Christ thrice, abandoned his ministry, and returned to his former life on Galilee (without Christ). Peter’s ninth foolish statement summarizes that pitiful choice, “I go a fishing” (John 21:3). Hearing and seeing him, six other Apostles follow him to “fish in the flesh.” Wasting time and energy (again), “they caught nothing!” Thankfully, Christ will appear to restore them all to ministry….

Our latest Bible Q&A: “Why was the Lord crucified between two thieves?

Impetuous Peter! #9

Friday, February 26, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

Peter’s eighth rash moment was actually two similar sentences voiced in rapid succession just before Christ entered the Garden of Gethsemane. Matthew 26:31-35 relays the details: “[31] Then saith Jesus unto them, All ye shall be offended because of me this night: for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be scattered abroad. [32] But after I am risen again, I will go before you into Galilee. [33] Peter answered and said unto him, Though all men shall be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended. [34] Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, That this night, before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice. [35] Peter said unto him, Though I should die with thee, yet will I not deny thee. Likewise also said all the disciples.”

Mark 14:27-31 now: “[27] And Jesus saith unto them, All ye shall be offended because of me this night: for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered. [28] But after that I am risen, I will go before you into Galilee. [29] But Peter said unto him, Although all shall be offended, yet will not I. [30] And Jesus saith unto him, Verily I say unto thee, That this day, even in this night, before the cock crow twice, thou shalt deny me thrice. [31] But he spake the more vehemently, If I should die with thee, I will not deny thee in any wise. Likewise also said they all.”

Christ knew the Scriptures (Zechariah 13:7): the sheep, His Little Flock, would be scattered. All His followers would abandon Him at His arrest. However, Peter was self-willed, arguing twice with Jesus. “Thou canst count on me, Lord! Everyone else will let Thee down, but not me! I shalt die before I betray Thee!” Of course, Peter broke his promise thrice, denying Jesus thrice (Matthew 26:69-75; Mark 14:66-72; Luke 22:54-62; John 18:15-18,25-27). Peter’s silly statements continue….

Impetuous Peter! #8

Thursday, February 25, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

On the night of Jesus’ arrest, He and His Little Flock (Israel’s believing remnant) were in the Upper Room. After learning of a traitor in their midst, how he would turn Jesus over to the apostate authorities, these precious saints started fighting with each other. Luke chapter 22: “[21] But, behold, the hand of him that betrayeth me is with me on the table. [22] And truly the Son of man goeth, as it was determined: but woe unto that man by whom he is betrayed! [23] And they began to enquire among themselves, which of them it was that should do this thing. [24] And there was also a strife among them, which of them should be accounted the greatest.” Their pride was in contrast to the foot-washing Jesus humbly performed on them in John chapter 13.

Later in chapter 13 of John, this happened: “[33] Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you. [34] A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another. [35] By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another. [36] Simon Peter said unto him, Lord, whither goest thou? Jesus answered him, Whither I go, thou canst not follow me now; but thou shalt follow me afterwards. [37] Peter said unto him, Lord, why cannot I follow thee now? I will lay down my life for thy sake. [38] Jesus answered him, Wilt thou lay down thy life for my sake? Verily, verily, I say unto thee, The cock shall not crow, till thou hast denied me thrice.”

Peter’s seventh foolish assertion is documented in verse 37: “I will lay down my life for thy sake.” He proceeds to boast yet again….

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Impetuous Peter! #7

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

In the Upper Room in Jerusalem, the night of Jesus’ final Passover with His disciples, Peter uttered his sixth reckless statement. Chapter 13 of John: “[3] Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he was come from God, and went to God; [4] He riseth from supper, and laid aside his garments; and took a towel, and girded himself. [5] After that he poureth water into a bason, and began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel wherewith he was girded.

“[6] Then cometh he to Simon Peter: and Peter saith unto him, Lord, dost thou wash my feet? [7] Jesus answered and said unto him, What I do thou knowest not now; but thou shalt know hereafter. [8] Peter saith unto him, Thou shalt never wash my feet. Jesus answered him, If I wash thee not, thou hast no part with me. [9] Simon Peter saith unto him, Lord, not my feet only, but also my hands and my head. [10] Jesus saith to him, He that is washed needeth not save to wash his feet, but is clean every whit: and ye are clean, but not all. [11] For he knew who should betray him; therefore said he, Ye are not all clean. [14] If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another’s feet. [15] For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you. [16] Verily, verily, I say unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord; neither he that is sent greater than he that sent him.”

Demonstrating humility and servitude, Jesus washed His disciples’ feet. Nevertheless, Peter protested, “Thou shalt never wash my feet” (verse 8). Christ corrected him, to which Peter replied in verse 9, “Wash my feet, hands, and head!” Excuse the idiomatic pun, but Peter’s feet had been previously unavailable for washing because they were in his mouth….

Impetuous Peter! #6

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

In Matthew 18:15-20, the Lord taught members of the Little Flock (Israel’s believing remnant) how to handle their offending each other. Peter is thus prompted to inquire in verse 21: “Then came Peter to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times?” The Jewish rabbis of the day, appealing to Amos chapters 1 and 2, taught an erring brother was to be forgiven a maximum of three times. Hence, Peter assumed he was quite generous by suggesting seven—that is, doubling the rabbinical tradition and then adding one. Was this sensible of him? No, it was his fifth thoughtless utterance!

Christ’s response is verse 22: “Jesus saith unto him, I say not unto thee, Until seven times: but, Until seventy times seven.” The Lord chose “seventy times seven”—that is, 490 (and not, as modern English versions say, “seventy-seven”)—He was underscoring a famed Old Testament passage. Read Daniel 9:24-27. Here, we look at verse 24 only: Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal up the vision and prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.”

God has reserved a period of 490 years—70 “weeks” (70 groups of “seven years”)—to cleanse Israel’s people of their sin problem. That time spans Nehemiah chapter 2 (circa 445 B.C.) to Christ’s Second Coming (Millennial Kingdom), excluding our Dispensation of Grace. Jesus’ reply to Peter was, “Until seventy times seven.” In light of Daniel, we can paraphrase Him: “Peter, you should forgive your Jewish neighbor to the extent I forgive your Jewish nation.” Remember, the schedule of Daniel 9:24 was operating when Jesus spoke those words to Peter! Peter should have remembered the prophetic timeline governing the Lord’s dealings with His people….

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Impetuous Peter! #5

Monday, February 22, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

The Transfiguration is recorded in Matthew 16:28–17:13, Mark 9:1-13, and Luke 9:27-36. Read from Mark, including today’s Scripture: “[1] And he said unto them, Verily I say unto you, That there be some of them that stand here, which shall not taste of death, till they have seen the kingdom of God come with power. [2] And after six days Jesus taketh with him Peter, and James, and John, and leadeth them up into an high mountain apart by themselves: and he was transfigured before them. [3] And his raiment became shining, exceeding white as snow; so as no fuller on earth can white them.

[4] And there appeared unto them Elias with Moses: and they were talking with Jesus. [5] And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. [6] For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid. [7] And there was a cloud that overshadowed them: and a voice came out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear him. [8] And suddenly, when they had looked round about, they saw no man any more, save Jesus only with themselves.”

It is the Feast of Tabernacles, late September or early October (cf. Leviticus 23:33-44). Situated in a glimpse of Christ’s glorious millennial kingdom, both Moses (the Law of Moses) and Elijah (the Prophets) foretold His death. Peter expected Moses and Elijah to remain there with them. Not applying wisdom (Mark 9:6, “he wist not what to say;” Luke 9:33, “not knowing what he said”), Peter exclaimed, “We should make booths or shelters for all three—Jesus, Moses, and Elijah!” Offended, Father God suddenly interrupted Peter’s fourth careless outburst with, “Listen to My beloved Son!” Jesus alone remains, His fulfilling the Law and the Prophets causing Moses and Elijah to vanish. Here, Peter had been impetuous and idolatrous….

Impetuous Peter! #4

Sunday, February 21, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

Near the end of His earthly ministry, Christ revealed some startling news to His disciples. Both Matthew and Mark report the third time Peter swiftly spoke foolish words. Read Matthew 16:21-23: “[21] From that time forth began Jesus to shew unto his disciples, how that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised again the third day. [22] Then Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall not be unto thee. [23] But he turned, and said unto Peter, Get thee behind me, Satan: thou art an offence unto me: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but those that be of men.”

Mark 8:31-33 is the parallel passage: “[31] And he began to teach them, that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders, and of the chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. [32] And he spake that saying openly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him. [33] But when he had turned about and looked on his disciples, he rebuked Peter, saying, Get thee behind me, Satan: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but the things that be of men.”

Upon hearing Jesus speak of His impeding mistreatment and murder, Peter began to criticize and challenge the Lord’s statement: “Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall not be unto thee” (Matthew 16:22). That is, “Lord, God be gracious in not letting that happen to Thee!” Jesus replied, “Get thee behind me, Satan: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but the things that be of men.” Peter, inadvertently serving as Satan’s spokesperson, outright denied Christ would die. Christ thus reprimanded him! Instead of believing God’s words, Peter was “savouring” (thinking) like a lost man….

Impetuous Peter! #3

Saturday, February 20, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

For Peter’s second hasty statement, consider Matthew chapter 14: “[24] But the ship was now in the midst of the sea, tossed with waves: for the wind was contrary. [25] And in the fourth watch of the night Jesus went unto them, walking on the sea. [26] And when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, It is a spirit; and they cried out for fear. [27] But straightway Jesus spake unto them, saying, Be of good cheer; it is I; be not afraid.

“[28] And Peter answered him and said, Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water. [29] And he said, Come. And when Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the water, to go to Jesus. [30] But when he saw the wind boisterous, he was afraid; and beginning to sink, he cried, saying, Lord, save me. [31] And immediately Jesus stretched forth his hand, and caught him, and said unto him, O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt? [32] And when they were come into the ship, the wind ceased. [33] Then they that were in the ship came and worshipped him, saying, Of a truth thou art the Son of God.”

Christ had been delayed in meeting them (cf. verses 22,23), but He eventually walked out onto the Sea of Galilee. Representative of all the disciples in the boat, Peter was not expecting Him, so he blurted out the conditional statement, “Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water” (verse 28). Christ gave Peter permission to walk on the water too. Howbeit, as Peter strolled, he looked around at his dangerous circumstances (violent wind)—and, as doubt and fear overcame him, he began to sink (verse 30)! Quick to say he would walk to the Lord, the dear Apostle, when afforded the opportunity, was distracted and literally fell. Thankfully, Jesus grabbed him before he drowned….

Bible Q&A #810: “What is Paul’s ‘lie’ in Romans 3:7?

Impetuous Peter! #2

Friday, February 19, 2021

And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid (Mark 9:5,6 KJV).

When in doubt, close your mouth!

Fisherman Simon Peter, a convert of John the Baptist, first met the Lord Jesus along the Jordan River just north of the Dead Sea (John 1:40-42). Later, Simon was with his business associates, James and John sons of Zebedee, up north on the Sea of Galilee. Luke chapter 5 continues: “[4] Now when he [Christ] had left speaking, he said unto Simon, Launch out into the deep, and let down your nets for a draught. [5] And Simon answering said unto him, Master, we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net.

“[6] And when they had this done, they inclosed a great multitude of fishes: and their net brake. [7] And they beckoned unto their partners, which were in the other ship, that they should come and help them. And they came, and filled both the ships, so that they began to sink. [8] When Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord. [9] For he was astonished, and all that were with him, at the draught of the fishes which they had taken: [10] And so was also James, and John, the sons of Zebedee, which were partners with Simon. And Jesus said unto Simon, Fear not; from henceforth thou shalt catch men. [11] And when they had brought their ships to land, they forsook all, and followed him.”

Peter whined they had returned emptyhanded after fishing the entire night (verse 5). He was therefore hesitant when Jesus ordered him to let down his nets to catch fish. Upon seizing many fish, however, he knelt before the Lord, confessing, “Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord” (verse 8). Peter voiced his regret, as if to say, “I should not have doubted Thee!” Luke 5:5 was just the first of several times Simon Peter articulated a poor choice of words….