Death in the Pot!

Friday, August 24, 2018

So they poured out for the men to eat. And it came to pass, as they were eating of the pottage, that they cried out, and said, O thou man of God, there is death in the pot (2 Kings 4:40 KJV).

Why is there “death in the pot?” What is the remedy?

“[38] And Elisha came again to Gilgal: and there was a dearth [famine] in the land; and the sons of the prophets were sitting before him: and he said unto his servant, Set on the great pot, and seethe pottage for the sons of the prophets. [39] And one went out into the field to gather herbs, and found a wild vine, and gathered thereof wild gourds his lap full, and came and shred them into the pot of pottage: for they knew them not. [40] So they poured out for the men to eat. And it came to pass, as they were eating of the pottage, that they cried out, and said, O thou man of God, there is death in the pot. And they could not eat thereof.”

Elisha, God’s prophet, instructed his servant to boil a soup for the sons of the prophets. One “son” scouted and unwittingly collected gourds from “a wild vine.” He tossed them into the pot without their knowledge. Later, the men realized they were eating toxic food! Verse 41 continues, “But [Elisha] said, Then bring meal. And he cast it into the pot; and he said, Pour out for the people, that they may eat. And there was no harm in the pot.” Elisha had them bring “meal” (flour), which he threw into the soup to make it harmless. Strange! What is being communicated by this miracle?

Israel is called God’s “vine” (Isaiah 5:7; Psalm 80:8); in contrast, the wild vine is sinful, man’s efforts (note the “wild grapes” of Isaiah 5:2). Human works corrupt God’s work. However, when God’s Word is added, the evil is overcome. Scripture is likened unto bread, flour (Matthew 4:4). God’s Word can transform sinful (spiritually deadly) Israel into a blessing! “And I will put my spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes, and ye shall keep my judgments, and do them” (Ezekiel 36:27). Israel has a glorious hope indeed! 🙂