He Worshipped Him

Sunday, August 26, 2018

“And he said, Lord, I believe. And he worshipped him” (John 9:38 KJV).

What can today’s Scripture teach us about the Bible versions debate?

Jesus walks by a man blind from birth (verse 1). He spits on the ground to make a clay-spittle mixture, then rubs it on the man’s eyes (verse 6). Jesus instructs him to wash in the pool of Siloam (“Sent”); he obeys and receives his sight (verse 7). Israel’s religious leaders are furious because it is the Sabbath (verses 13-16). The formerly-blind man is ridiculed and expelled, meeting Jesus again later.

The 1901 American Standard Version says in today’s Scripture: “And he said, Lord, I believe. And he worshipped him.” This is the 1611 King James Bible verbatim. Yet, notice the ASV’s footnote: “The Greek word denotes an act of reverence, whether paid to a creature (as here) or to the Creator (see ch. 4.20).” Did you notice what these 1901 translators claimed?

Reread their footnote: “The Greek word denotes an act of reverence, whether paid to a creature (as here) or to the Creator (see ch. 4.20).” Did you catch it yet? Try once more: “The Greek word denotes an act of reverence, whether paid to a creature (as here) or to the Creator (see ch. 4.20).” Those two little parenthetical words, “as here,” expose the evil, perverted hearts of the ASV translators. Shocking huh?! They, their scholarship, translating philosophy, and textual/manuscript preferences remain with us today with the 100-plus subsequent modern English versions that resulted from this first American modern English Bible.

Acts chapter 10 features the same Greek word for “worship:” “[25] And as Peter was coming in, Cornelius met him, and fell down at his feet, and worshipped him. [26] But Peter took him up, saying, Stand up; I myself also am a man.” Revelation chapter 19: “[10] And I fell at his feet to worship him. And he said unto me, See thou do it not: I am thy fellowservant, and of thy brethren that have the testimony of Jesus: worship God: for the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy.” If the ASV translators are correct—Jesus was worshipped as a “creature”—then why did He not forbid it as Peter did with Cornelius (Acts 10:26) and the Angel did with John (Revelation 19:10)? Someone is lying—and it is not God!

Our latest Bible Q&A: “Did Jesus ever claim to be God?

A Child of God

Sunday, July 29, 2018

For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus. For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus (Galatians 3:26-28 KJV).

Who is a “child of God?” Who is a Christian?

Someone once stated, “Today, it seems like a Christian is anyone who is not a Jew or a Muslim.” Think about it, dear friend. The name “Christian” has been used so flippantly and inappropriately that its meaning is misconstrued and buried under layers of false teaching. What makes a Christian? What is Christian doctrine?

The Bible rightly divided is the textbook of Christianity—the standard whereby we gauge right from wrong, truth from error. As English-speaking people, God’s Word for us is the King James Bible. It was translated properly (formal equivalence) from the correct Greek and Hebrew texts (Textus Receptus Greek and Masoretic Hebrew). It has every verse, every word, and every letter that should be there. We must be careful to identify and avoid competing authorities—corrupt modern English versions representing ancient but perverted Greek and Hebrew manuscripts, church tradition, preachers’ opinions, et cetera.

A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ. The first (and most important) way a person follows Jesus Christ is by believing what He believes—He died for our sins, was buried, and rose again (1 Corinthians 15:3,4). Faith in this Gospel of Grace alone is how we show God we understand there is absolutely nothing we can do to please Him in our flesh (efforts). Notice, a Christian is not defined as somebody who faithfully attends church services, reads the Bible, prays, does good deeds.

God is not looking for our works (religion). He is looking first and foremost for “faith in Christ Jesus” (today’s Scripture). Faith is an admission that our works are not the issue, but an affirmation that Christ’s finished work at Calvary is the issue! After we trust Jesus Christ as personal Saviour, then we follow Him on a daily basis by reading and trusting what He instructed the Apostle Paul to tell us in the Bible Books of Romans through Philemon.

Our latest Bible Q&A: “Do Galatians 6:2 and Galatians 6:5 contradict each other?

How to Know the Holy Bible

Sunday, April 8, 2018

All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works (2 Timothy 3:16,17 KJV).

Friend, have you ever wondered how to know the Holy Bible?

Years ago, like most, I assumed all Bible versions said basically the same thing; oddly, I was also a King James Bible critic. Then, instead of naïvely repeating hearsay, I began researching. The beautiful leather covers, insightful study notes, contemporary English, extra-wide margins, attractive graphics, “unparalleled scholarship,” and large print aside, something quite sinister underlies the Bible versions issue. God’s chief enemy, Satan, wants to remove the Bible from its place as the final authority. Genesis 3:1-5 captures Satan’s first words spoken in Scripture: if he can question God’s Word, add to it, take from it, water it down, or completely deny it, he has you on his side without you realizing it!

Anglophone (English-speaking) Christians once had one voice because they used one standard set of Bible manuscripts. This ceased approximately 140 years ago with the arrival of contemporary English Bible translations based on completely different manuscripts. Consequently, verses are now removed, words have been inserted, and familiar Christian phrases are watered down. Roughly 200 modern English versions have now been released to the general public. Many Bible translators and publishers—not necessarily Christians but shrewd entrepreneurs—see economic incentives. Moreover, those exalting heretical (counterfeit) Bible manuscripts hide their motives by releasing nocuous yet “easy-to-read” English versions. Sadly, today’s “Bible scholars” are usually not interested in maintaining and defending the integrity of the Holy Bible.

The King James Bible has served the Church the Body of Christ well for over 400 years. A sure foundation in this ever-darkening, ever-depreciating world, it has withstood the test of time. We cannot afford to be waffling between hundreds of English Bibles; alas, to Satan’s delight, much of the professing church is doing just that. Friend, if you are to be “throughly furnished unto all good works” (today’s Scripture), then you must (!) have the inspired, preserved Word of God for English speakers—the King James Bible. Your Christian life depends on having that final authority!

Our latest Bible Q&A: “What are the ‘sins that are past’ in Romans 3:25?

A Book That Will Teach

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

“Which things also we speak, not in the words which man’s wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual” (1 Corinthians 2:13 KJV).

Today’s Scripture tells us who alone we can trust to teach us God’s truth!

Once, I heard a minister give his self-proclaimed “prophetic” message about top headlines that would appear in the coming year. While he reassured his audience that he received this information directly from “the Lord” (?), he gave a disclaimer: “I do not know, but at the end of this year, we will see if what I say came to pass.” Unlike the inner impressions and hunches of this “Christian” preacher, the Holy Bible is infallible, and we can trust its information completely.

Long, long ago, God Almighty wrote a Book, and He preserved it through history through a multiplicity of manuscript copies, so that it could eventually be translated into English, so we could read it even today! (Of course, Satan, the master counterfeiter that he is, most certainly had his own manuscripts—they still circulate today as corrupt Bible translations.) God promised to preserve His words forever (Psalm 12:6,7; Isaiah 30:8; Matthew 24:35; 1 Peter 1:25). Consequently, every person will stand before Him one day to give account as to what he or she did with that Bible. Did we reject it in favor of counterfeits? Did we re-translate it to fit our denominational beliefs? Did we apply it to life by faith? Did we even read it at all?

As English-speaking people, we understand—or, at least, we should understand—that we can trust the 400-year-old King James Bible. Sadly, even in many church circles, we are often cautioned not to trust God’s preserved Word. Unfortunately, footnotes, study notes, and seminarians usually attempt to claim that authority by offering “better” readings or “better” manuscripts. Beloved, we can do without unbelieving textual critics and their “scholarship.” God does not need lost people to explain His Word to His children; He never did and He never will (1 Corinthians 2:14). Never forget that!

The Holy Spirit will teach us the King James Bible if we “read” (Ephesians 3:4), “study” (2 Timothy 2:15), and “consider” it (2 Timothy 2:7)!

The Virgin Conception of Christ

Monday, December 18, 2017

“Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel” (Isaiah 7:14 KJV).

While Christendom speaks of the “virgin birth of Christ,” according to today’s Scripture, a more accurate term would be the “virgin conception of Christ.” There was nothing unusual about Christ’s birth; it was His conception that was unique because there was no human father!

Interestingly, today’s Scripture has been the point of controversy for over a century (to Satan’s delight!). Some modern Bibles (RSV, NRSV, et al.) translate the Hebrew word here translated “virgin” as the vague “young woman,” thereby leaving room for the heretical idea that Joseph was Jesus’ biological father (and denying Christ’s deity)! If someone ever tells you almah (the Hebrew word translated “virgin”) can mean “young woman” or “virgin,” they are right, but point out that the key to choosing the right translation is not up to a translator, but rather the Holy Ghost!

The author of Matthew’s Gospel, filled with the Holy Ghost, knew which translation—“young woman” or “virgin”—was what God had intended in Isaiah 7:14. If we want to know what God meant in Isaiah 7:14, why not ask God?

“Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, “Behold a virgin shall be with child…” (Matthew 1:22,23a). The Greek word translated “virgin,” parthenos, can only mean “virgin,” not “young woman.” Isaiah was prophesying a virgin, indicated by the words “firstborn son” (Matthew 1:25; Luke 2:7) and “Joseph knew her not till she had brought forth her firstborn son” (Matthew 1:25). Isaiah 7:14 meant “virgin,” as indicated by Luke 1:34, for Mary “knew not a man.” Again, the Bible is clear that Joseph was not Jesus’ biological father.

Matthew 1:23 indisputably proves that almah in Isaiah 7:14 did not simply mean a “young woman,” who may or may not be sexually pure, but “a virgin,” a woman who never had any sexual intercourse. The Holy Ghost, not Joseph, was the Father of Jesus’ body (Matthew 1:18-20).

For more information, see our archived Bible Q&A: “What is the real Immaculate Conception?

The Lord of Sabaoth

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

“Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of sabaoth” (James 5:4 KJV).

What does “the Lord of Sabaoth” mean?

The King James Bible twice uses the title “the Lord of Sabaoth.” One instance is today’s Scripture. The other is Romans 9:29: “And as Esaias said before, Except the Lord of Sabaoth had left us a seed, we had been as Sodoma, and been made like unto Gomorrha.” Interestingly enough, if we search the Scriptures to find the words of “Esaias” (Greek form of “Isaiah”), we will learn what “the Lord of Sabaoth” means.

When the Apostle Paul penned Romans 9:29, the Holy Spirit led him to quote Isaiah 1:9: “Except the LORD of hosts had left unto us a very small remnant, we should have been as Sodom, and we should have been like unto Gomorrah.” Notice the accuracy of this divinely-inspired translation! Has anything been “lost in translation” as modern Bible textual critics often claim? No.

The Holy Spirit through Paul took the Hebrew words of the Book of Isaiah and translated them into Koine Greek to form part of the Book of Romans. We find the meaning of “the Lord of sabaoth by simply reading Isaiah’s original wording: “the LORD of hosts.” Actually, sabaoth is the English transliteration of the Greek word (sabaoth) derived from the Hebrew word tsaba. Tsaba, or “hosts,” is the same word the Prophet Isaiah used.

In summary, the title “the Lord of Sabaoth” means “the Lord of Hosts.” Now, what does that mean? It signifies God’s military might—that is, His strength to fight and win battles. The LORD is commander-in-chief of the angelic soldiers and the human armies of Israel (“the LORD of hostsis defined in 1 Samuel 17:45 as “the God of the armies of Israel”). Romans 9:25-29 and James 5:4 look forward to the day when the Lord Jesus returns to Earth in wrath—His Second Coming—to conquer Satan and destroy the wicked, Jew and Gentile (non-Jew) alike.

Autocorrect

Thursday, April 27, 2017

“I thought on my ways, and turned my feet unto thy testimonies” (Psalm 119:59 KJV).

When we approach Scripture, may we be willing to let it automatically correct us!

In this age of computers, especially smartphones and other personal electronic devices, we have become more associated, for better or worse, with a feature called “autocorrect.” If you have typed a word or letter by mistake, special software automatically corrects your error. This is very handy—especially if you are a poor speller. However, the downside is that the computer may misinterpret you. Perhaps you wish to spell someone’s name, a location, or a specialized term—something probably not found in the average dictionary. Or, maybe you are quoting words that were originally misspelled. Perhaps you are using a foreign word. Whatever the case, the automatic “correction” is damaging rather than helpful. “Autocorrect” would be incorrect!

Sadly, people, even professing Christians, function just like autocorrect software and “correct” the Bible. They mean well—hopefully—but they are better off not commenting about matters in which they are unskilled. They have an overestimation of their Bible understanding: they believe they are qualified to change Scripture at will. Just as the software would “think” a unique word is misspelled, so people assume they can adjust God’s words to make them fit human reasoning. This flawed approach to Scripture drives textual criticism—the “scholarly” science of “reconstructing” the Bible text that was supposedly “lost” in the centuries since the Apostles. These “restorations” are a series of critical works surviving even to this present hour—namely, Greek New Testaments (about 30 different ones) and their resulting English translations (100-plus different ones)!

It is silly to point out, but it must be said. Computer software, since it is not living, cannot approach the Bible in faith. We, however, can and should use spiritual understanding to see why the King James Bible text says what it does, before we mindlessly change what it says. Whenever we alter the Bible, we cannot fathom the depths of ignorance in which we have just placed ourselves. Friends, we do not correct the Bible; it is perfect (Proverbs 30:5,6). Brethren, we let the Bible correct us; we are imperfect (2 Timothy 3:16,17).